Myths About Breast Cancer

MYTH 1: You have to have a family history of breast cancer to be at risk

The truth is, most women with breast cancer don’t have a family history of the disease.  Only about 13 percent of women diagnosed have a first-degree female relative (mother, sister or daughter) with breast cancer. Having said this…

A woman who has a first-degree female relative with breast cancer has almost twice the risk of a woman without this family history. If she has more than 1 first-degree female relative with a history of breast cancer, her risk is about 3-4 times higher.

Regardless of your beliefs or fears, please do your breast exams and get your mammograms.

If you’d like to learn more about breast cancer and your risks you can go to the Susan G. Komen.

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What’s Inside Your Breast Implant?

According to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS), of the 1.7 million cosmetic surgical procedures performed in 2015, breast augmentation was among the top 5. I would think it’s closer to the number one spot, but that’s just my opinion.

 

It doesn’t matter whether you’re planning for breast reconstruction or you’re considering augmentation, I think you’ll find this video helpful.

“Traditionally, most breast implants had a silicone shell filled with liquid silicone. Newer, shaped implants have a silicone shell with cohesive gel silicone inside. The benefit of the shaped silicone is that these implants do not leak like traditional implants. Here we are cutting an implant in half to show you what is inside. Nothing leaks out!” Dr. Leif Rogers, MD, FACS

 

Traditionally, most breast implants had a silicone shell filled with liquid silicone. Newer, shaped implants have a silicone shell with cohesive gel silicone inside. The benefit of the shaped silicone is that these implants do not leak like traditional implants. Here we are cutting an implant in half to show you what is inside. Nothing leaks out! ⠀ 👤Facebook: Leif Rogers, MD 👻Snapchat: @LeifRogersMD 🐦Twitter: @LeifRogersMD 📺YouTube: Leif Rogers, MD ⠀ 🏢310-860-8915⠀ ⠀ ⠀ Check out our non-surgical aesthetic account @privetaesthetics for even more videos! ⠀ #LeifRogersMD #LRMD #breast #implant #breastimplant #cup #size #shape #body #chest #perfection #silicone #atheltic #aesthetics #cosmetics #plasticsurgeon #plasticsurgery #BeverlyHills #Pasadena #LA #LosAngeles #California

A post shared by Leif Rogers, MD, FACS (@leifrogersmd) on

 

While I was planning for breast reconstruction I couldn’t get any doctor to show me the inside of an implant. In fact, in most cases, doctors didn’t even have the right sample for me to see or touch before making a selection.

*I’ve never met with Dr. Rogers. This is not an endorsement. Please do your own research prior to selecting a surgeon.*

 

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What Do I Say To Someone With Cancer?

Last week, I posted an article on the 5 Things You Should Never Say To Someone With #Cancer. Martina McBride’s song “I’m Gonna Love You Through It” speaks volumes. The following are a combination of phrases that will help you say the right thing.

  1. I am sorry. Three words in the English language that says it all.
  2. What can I do? My three favorite words in any crisis.
  3. I don’t know what to say. There’s nothing wrong with being honest as long as it’s not hurtful or injecting fear. Once the shock wears off you can always go back and say what you wish you could have at the time.
  4. I’m scared. The cancer fighter knows all about fear. It’s okay to share your fears together.
  5. You’re going to survive this. Everyone needs to believe this, and it helps if you do too. We all need hope.
  6. I’m gonna love you through it. When you say this, and you mean it, you’ll be there for your friend, mother, sister whatever. It’s the one thing that you could say that sums all of this up.