I Love This Skincare Series

I Love This Skincare Series

Okay. So, I know the rich and famous have more money and resources than everyday people. But they also have good beauty and self-care tips, because they have access to some of the best doctors and skincare specialist’ in the world.

So even though I may not be able to afford the same products they use, I DO benefit from their pointers. With that said, today, I’m sharing one of my favorite skincare YouTube series with you. Go To Bed With Me features celeb status women and models who dish on their skincare habits, products and secrets. The episodes are produced by Harper’s Bazaar.

In this episode, Demi Moore shares her nighttime skincare routine. Like me, she has sensitive skin and has to avoid anything scented. This may be the perfect regimen for anyone with asthma, allergies or fighting cancer. Chemotherapy changes everything in the body making the senses and the skin more sensitive, so if you’re a cancer fighter you might appreciate this one, too.

Demi Moore is 57 (if you’re curious). Aging is hard. But if I have to do it (and it IS better than the alternative), I feel so grateful to do so in a world where so many women are choosing how they’re going to age, unlike our parents and grandparents who were stuck with just one image of 50, and it wasn’t very sexy.

Enjoy!


P.S. Have you ever used the makeup eraser? If so, do you like it? I’m waiting for mine to come in so I’ll let you know what I think in a few weeks. If there’s one thing I’m learning…it’s that the older I get, the more gentle I need to be with my skin.

Image of woman in towel sourced at Pexels.

Menopause Meltdown

Menopause Meltdown

Dear friends and menopause survivors, today I come to you in the midst of a menopause meltdown.

Menopause has been nothing but an uphill climb.

Two of the most challenging symptoms for me have been clumsiness, and memory failure.

As I write this I can’t find a credit card I had in my hand an hour ago.

I’ve turned the entire house upside down trying to find it. I’ve turned my purse and wallet inside out.

I’ve taken everything out of my freezer and refrigerator—-yes, I said the freezer and the refrigerator.

You’d be surprised how many things end up there these days.

Adding insult to injury is that I can’t even re-trace my steps because I don’t remember what I was doing when the card was in my hand.

I know I made tacos for lunch. I can only hope the card didn’t make it into the pan.

Maybe I got a phone call. Maybe I got a text message. Maybe I had to go to the bathroom. Maybe my brain just took a break at an inconvenient time.

But whatever the reason, I can’t find it. And all I feel is defeat, frustration and upset.

This happens a lot since menopause charged into my life like a bull in a china shop.

Some days I can’t remember where I parked my car. And I’m always on the hunt for something: my keys, my underwear or my glasses–usually on my face.

The glasses, that is. Not the underwear. If those end up on my head then menopause has completely taken over.

A good day for me is when I leave the house with two matching shoes on and my lipstick on my face where it’s supposed to be.

Most women in menopause tend to be aggressive towards their husbands during this time. Some don’t even like them anymore.

(We’ll talk more about menopause divorce in another article).

Thankfully, I don’t feel that way about my husband.

But…I am re-thinking my strategy on that because when I’m in the menopause tunnel (that’s what I call it), I don’t have the patience for a 110 questions on why I thought spaghetti seemed like a good idea for dinner.

Also, I don’t have the patience for any tone I don’t recognize or a certain kind of teasing, both of which my husband did wrong at Costco over the weekend.

I truly thought I was going to end up on the news for giving him a menopause smackdown.

Thankfully, all ended well.

I still can’t find my credit card and while I can laugh a little now that I’ve written this, I’m still so bummed, because I have a purse in my shopping cart that I really need to purchase today.

Okay that’s a wrap for now. If you’re still here thank you for listening to me.

If you’re a menopause survivor I’d really love to hear from you.

What are your symptoms? How are you coping? How has menopause impacted you on an emotional level?

Speak your #menopausetruth here!

Menopause Minute: in the news

Menopause Minute: in the news

Welcome to Issue No. 4 | #MenopauseMinute

There’s no doubt the number one common denominator in the “second puberty” phase a.k.a. menopause, is hot flashes.

Every woman I’ve spoken with in menopause all say it started with an uncomfortable heat that seemed to come out of nowhere.

In case you’re wondering: hot flashes have the same sensation you get when you feel embarrassed.

You know how you start to feel hot inside and then your underarms start to itch and then you feel like your whole face is red? That’s it! Only intensified.

There have been many times when I’ve felt like I was going to pass out from the heat.

Did I mention? It can even happen in a cool room or winter.

The good news is, at least in my case, hot flashes tend to decrease during cooler months.

Thank goodness!

In the news

Fox 8 Cleveland News put together a helpful piece on coping with hot flashes. It included some practical tips.

Here’s what they said:

The most common complaint women have during menopause is experiencing hot flashes. There are many ways to manage them without medication.

Nonpharmacological options include:

 

  • Dressing in layers.
  • Carrying a portable fan.
  • Exercising.
  • Making sure to regulate the temperature in your home.
  • Making your bed so you can take blankets off if you need to.

End of article

Menopause Minute: menopause and sleep

Menopause Minute: menopause and sleep

Welcome to issue No. 2 |Menopause Minute.

I can’t begin to tell you how many nights I lay awake tossing and turning.

I’ve tried counting sheep, counting backwards, deep breathing, relaxation and reading.

I scroll through Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram and anything else I can think of hoping to bore myself to sleep.

With each strike of the hour I feel more and more frustratated.

Some nights I feel so irritated I’m tempted to kick my husband outta bed just for sleeping so well.

I’ve tried a wide array of pillows. Lavender oils and spray.

By 5am I usually just give up on sleep and power through the day.

But I miss my sleep.

And when I talk to to doctors about it (women, by the way), they just look at me and nod in agreement and say nothing.

This is troubling to me because menopause can render us vulnerable to major health issues like, heart disease. (We’ll cover this stuff more, later).

So, what’s the deal with menopause and sleep deprivation?

Hormones!

Hormones can and do wreak havoc on the mind and body.

When you’re having your “periods” you have PMS. And when you’re In menopause…you have PMS.

Same acronym, different reasons.

According to National Sleep Foundation during the course of peri-menopause through menopause, a woman’s ovaries gradually decrease production of estrogen and progesterone, a sleep-promoting hormone.

PeriMenopause is the menopause transition and it starts several years before. It’s the time when the ovaries begin to make less estrogen.

The shifting of ratios of hormones can be an unsettling process, sometimes contributing to the inability to fall asleep.

Also, waning levels of estrogen may make you more susceptible to environmental and other factors and stressors which disrupt sleep.

What can I do about it?

Let’s start with some curated simple tips to coping. I think the first on this list is the best place to start.

Exercise. One of the best ways to get a good night’s sleep is to get regular physical activity. But you may need to work out earlier in the day.

Too much activity close to bedtime can make you more awake. Even if you have not exercised regularly in the past, starting to exercise during menopause may help you feel better.

Train your brain. If you wake during the night and can’t get back to sleep, get up and do something relaxing until you’re sleepy again.

Eat healthy. Avoid large meals, especially before bedtime. Maintain a regular, normal weight. Some foods that are spicy or acidic may trigger hot flashes. Try foods rich in soy as they might minimize hot flashes.

Dress in lightweight clothes. Avoid heavy, insulating blankets and think clothes. Consider using a fan or air conditioning to cool the air and increase circulation.

Is you have some tips, I’d love to hear from you. If you like what you read here, please share it. And please, chime in via the comments.

End of article

Sources: National Sleep Foundation, women’s health dot gov