Coming Clean

Coming Clean

Today I’m feeling some low grade depression. Over the last several months I’ve been privately coping with a diagnosis of osteoporosis. Osteoporosis means I’ve got a major case of bone loss. Most women in their menopause years have osteoporosis and don’t even know it.

Continue reading “Coming Clean”

Menopause Minute: in the news

Menopause Minute: in the news

Welcome to Issue No. 4 | #MenopauseMinute

There’s no doubt the number one common denominator in the “second puberty” phase a.k.a. menopause, is hot flashes.

Every woman I’ve spoken with in menopause all say it started with an uncomfortable heat that seemed to come out of nowhere.

In case you’re wondering: hot flashes have the same sensation you get when you feel embarrassed.

You know how you start to feel hot inside and then your underarms start to itch and then you feel like your whole face is red? That’s it! Only intensified.

There have been many times when I’ve felt like I was going to pass out from the heat.

Did I mention? It can even happen in a cool room or winter.

The good news is, at least in my case, hot flashes tend to decrease during cooler months.

Thank goodness!

In the news

Fox 8 Cleveland News put together a helpful piece on coping with hot flashes. It included some practical tips.

Here’s what they said:

The most common complaint women have during menopause is experiencing hot flashes. There are many ways to manage them without medication.

Nonpharmacological options include:

 

  • Dressing in layers.
  • Carrying a portable fan.
  • Exercising.
  • Making sure to regulate the temperature in your home.
  • Making your bed so you can take blankets off if you need to.

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For your health information: #BeautyMadeBetter

For your health information: #BeautyMadeBetter

Right now, cosmetics companies can put just about anything in their products – even chemicals associated with cancer and endocrine disruption.

Senators Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) and Susan Collins (R-Maine) have introduced a bill that would require cosmetics companies to prove that their products are safe before marketing them and would give the federal Food and Drug Administration the power to review risky ingredients.

S.1014 – Personal Care Products Safety Act

This bill amends the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act to require cosmetics companies to register their facilities with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and to submit to the FDA cosmetic ingredient statements that include the amounts of cosmetic’s ingredients.

Companies must pay a facility registration fee based on their annual gross sales of cosmetics.

The collected fees can only be used for the cosmetic safety activities.

If you’d like to learn more about the bill click HERE

If you’d like to support the bill, click HERE for the Environmental Working Group website.

Information provided by the EWG website and congress.gov

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What do I say to someone diagnosed with cancer?

What do I say to someone diagnosed with cancer?

It’s breast cancer awareness month and this means you can buy anything pink. In fact, I challenge you to find something not pink during this month.

Unfortunately, though, what you can’t buy with those pink items is an education about breast cancer (or any cancer) including, prevention.

And while I’m so happy we can talk about breast cancer considering there was a time when women suffered in silence, I do think we need to do more than “pinkwash.” I think education should be the focus.

So today, let’s start with three things you can say to the newly diagnosed should you find yourself at a loss for words.

3 Simple Phrases

 

“I’m sorry”

The reality is this; there are no words of wisdom at a time like cancer. The word “cancer” alone can clear a room or a social calendar. It can render you speechless.

Saying these these seemingly little words can convey you’re concern and care without saying things that could offend. You can always go back later and say more heartwarming words once you’ve collected your thoughts.

“What can I do?”

I think these words speak volumes especially for the newly diagnosed. I remember walking out of the breast clinic the day I got my diagnosis and thinking, what comes next?

Chemotherapy is big, ugly and scary and each person has their own reaction to it. So just knowing you can count on someone to do anything for you is comforting.

“I’m gonna love you through it”

These are words plucked right out of Martina McBride’s song entitled “I’m gonna love you through it.” But they are perfect! However you say it, the best thing you can say is that you are going to be right there with them. There’s no greater gift.

 

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