What do I say to someone diagnosed with cancer?

What do I say to someone diagnosed with cancer?

It’s breast cancer awareness month and this means you can buy anything pink. In fact, I challenge you to find something not pink during this month.

Unfortunately, though, what you can’t buy with those pink items is an education about breast cancer (or any cancer) including, prevention.

And while I’m so happy we can talk about breast cancer considering there was a time when women suffered in silence, I do think we need to do more than “pinkwash.” I think education should be the focus.

So today, let’s start with three things you can say to the newly diagnosed should you find yourself at a loss for words.

3 Simple Phrases

 

“I’m sorry”

The reality is this; there are no words of wisdom at a time like cancer. The word “cancer” alone can clear a room or a social calendar. It can render you speechless.

Saying these these seemingly little words can convey you’re concern and care without saying things that could offend. You can always go back later and say more heartwarming words once you’ve collected your thoughts.

“What can I do?”

I think these words speak volumes especially for the newly diagnosed. I remember walking out of the breast clinic the day I got my diagnosis and thinking, what comes next?

Chemotherapy is big, ugly and scary and each person has their own reaction to it. So just knowing you can count on someone to do anything for you is comforting.

“I’m gonna love you through it”

These are words plucked right out of Martina McBride’s song entitled “I’m gonna love you through it.” But they are perfect! However you say it, the best thing you can say is that you are going to be right there with them. There’s no greater gift.

 

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Myths About Breast Cancer

Myths About Breast Cancer

MYTH 1: You have to have a family history of breast cancer to be at risk

The truth is, most women with breast cancer don’t have a family history of the disease.  Only about 13 percent of women diagnosed have a first-degree female relative (mother, sister or daughter) with breast cancer. Having said this…

A woman who has a first-degree female relative with breast cancer has almost twice the risk of a woman without this family history. If she has more than 1 first-degree female relative with a history of breast cancer, her risk is about 3-4 times higher.

Regardless of your beliefs or fears, please do your breast exams and get your mammograms.

If you’d like to learn more about breast cancer and your risks you can go to the Susan G. Komen.

Please share.

Cancer Survival Kit

Cancer Survival Kit

Happy Friday, friends!
The number one question I get regarding the cancer patient is what should I buy someone with a diagnosis to show my support?

If you’re not sure what to buy the cancer fighter in your life, the first thing to do is to keep in mind how you feel when you are fighting a bug. What are some of the things that bring you comfort?

For example, hot soup and cozy pajamas always feel so good when you’re feeling ‘blah?’ It’s the same way for the cancer fighter. Here are some of my faves.

Consider gifting your loved one with a nice carryall bag equipped with Ginger Candy to help fight nausea and a soft small blanket to take to chemotherapy (sometimes it gets cold in that suite). You can check out Target for some faux fur blankets or Kaufman Mercantile for a beautiful classic cotton version.

A scarf is also a nice option. It’s a good idea to keep the neck covered when the body is weak. I’ll be posting more ideas soon but trust me, this is a great start!

Oh, I can’t forget my favorite cookbook! You will see this one a LOT around here; One Bite At a Time is authored by chef Rebecca Katz. She’s the best when it comes to cancer nourishment (in my opinion).

What nourishes your soul when you’re feeling under the weather?

Alwayz, April