Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Hi Friends!

Can you BELIEVE it’s October? I mean where does the time go? Speaking of time…October means it’s breast cancer awareness month, again. As a breast cancer survivor I know two things for sure 👉🏼breast cancer awareness is about more than buying pretty in pink packages. And 👉🏼early detection is the key to survival.

In order to catch cancer early you have to get to know your breasts.

I get it. The idea of poking around in your breast tissue is undesirable and uncomfortable. It feels weird. But, it can be the thing that helps you identify unusual lumps and bumps in the very early stages. Not all lumps are cancerous. In fact, experts say most aren’t. But you don’t want to take that chance. Trust me!So be sure to check your breasts EVERY month.

I don’t know how.

Before I was diagnosed I really didn’t know how to do my breast self-exams. I tried. I think I did okay. But I wish I’d known the correct way to do them. You can learn how to properly do your breast self-exams HERE

Get your mammogram.

Even if you do regular breast self-exams you should get your mammograms. Again, I know mammograms aren’t comfortable. Sometimes they even hurt. But combined with your personal exams, mammograms can help detect cancer in the very early stages. The sooner the better!

Early arrival, 90 percent survival.

Fran Drescher
Gif

So what are you going to do?

Made with Canva

Happy Weekend

Happy Weekend

Hey, Friends!

I’ve been so behind in posting, lately. It’s been a crazy-busy time here. One thing after another. And then there’s the days I just need to take a pause. A MENO-pause. The lack of hormones I produce in menopause seem to worsen certain days of the month. I call it “a dip.” And it’s a dip I feel as soon as it happens.

It’s very reminiscent of the PMS I used to get during my menstrual cycle. There’s about 7 to 10 days, every month, where I feel PMS-like for days at a time.

During this time I cope with a variety of symptoms from hating my clothes and everything about myself to feeling extremely sluggish. My memory fails the most in the dip. I can’t remember ANYTHING. People. Places. Things. And as for writing…well…I lose my ability to convey my thoughts, express my feelings or even form full sentences.

I’m in “the dip” now. It drives me mad.

Giphy

That’s partly why there’s a lag between my posts.’ Just when I thought I’d overcome inconsistency, I realize that a major reason why I’m so inconsistent and behind is because menopause symptoms interfere with how my brain works. I’m in the midst of writing about this topic, now. I plan to have an interview with a brain doc, soon. Maybe we can learn more.

With all that said, I think we have two choices when we find ourselves in uncomfortable spots: learn to navigate life with them, or give up altogether. I’m not going to lie to you. I was close to giving up on blogging. I found myself thinking that maybe, after all I’ve been through, I’ve lost my ability to write, tell a story or pretty much do anything else since menopause descended upon me.

That’s a hard pill to swallow. I mean, I used to work for a Pulitzer-Prize winning publication. How can this happen? Did I forget who I was? After awhile it occurred to me, I started the blog for a number of reasons. One of them was to help me work through these challenges. Challenges I now have after fighting cancer, going through chemo and NOW coping with menopause. I think even the best in the world would have challenges after surviving something that big. So, I’ll be back. I have to stick with this. The end benefit is for me.

Do you have something that challenges you? Will you share it in the comments section? How do you cope with your setbacks?

Wherever you are, I hope you can find time to relax over the weekend and take a break from the bad news.

Relax. Breathe. Shelve the heavy topics if you can.

Picture by Canva.

Chalkboard Notes | Healthy Living

Chalkboard Notes | Healthy Living

Hey guys!

Happy Monday to you. I hope this finds you staying healthy and happy no matter where you are. Today’s mood board is a reminder that even though many of you are busier than ever, you have to put you and your health at the top of the list. Especially, if you’re coping with health issues including mental health.

I know! I get it. You may be rolling your eyes at me right now. I’m busy, too. I feel like I’m doing more since the pandemic then I did pre-pandemic. But I’m not complaining about it.

I love that we are doing everything virtually. I think it’s great that this unforeseen occurrence is forcing us to think outside the box. With that said, I can’t wait for this pandemic to be behind us and my heart aches for those who have lost loved ones. I pray everyday that me and my own family stay healthy as well as those around us.

Until then, we have to take extra care of ourselves. Our families need us. You need to be here to see the rewards of your hard work and contributions, after the pandemic.

As a menopause and breast cancer survivor I know for sure you have to take a timeout for you and your health. There’s more to healthy living than what you eat and how you exercise (although both are important factors) to emotional and physical well-being.

Today, my mood board is my chalkboard. I’m sharing my list of notes to myself with you.

The Lifestyle Brief dot com

What are some things you are doing to stay healthy during these difficult times?

Menopause Minute: in the news

Menopause Minute: in the news

Welcome to Issue No. 4 | #MenopauseMinute

There’s no doubt the number one common denominator in the “second puberty” phase a.k.a. menopause, is hot flashes.

Every woman I’ve spoken with in menopause all say it started with an uncomfortable heat that seemed to come out of nowhere.

In case you’re wondering: hot flashes have the same sensation you get when you feel embarrassed.

You know how you start to feel hot inside and then your underarms start to itch and then you feel like your whole face is red? That’s it! Only intensified.

There have been many times when I’ve felt like I was going to pass out from the heat.

Did I mention? It can even happen in a cool room or winter.

The good news is, at least in my case, hot flashes tend to decrease during cooler months.

Thank goodness!

In the news

Fox 8 Cleveland News put together a helpful piece on coping with hot flashes. It included some practical tips.

Here’s what they said:

The most common complaint women have during menopause is experiencing hot flashes. There are many ways to manage them without medication.

Nonpharmacological options include:

 

  • Dressing in layers.
  • Carrying a portable fan.
  • Exercising.
  • Making sure to regulate the temperature in your home.
  • Making your bed so you can take blankets off if you need to.

End of article