Heat Stroke Prevention

Happy Monday, friends!

There’s no doubt summer is here. Yesterday, it was brutally hot in many parts of the country including, here.

The only thing that made the heat harder to deal with besides rolling blackouts is the California wildfires. As I write this, the California governor has declared California a state of emergency. So before I move on to the point of this article I just want to say “Thank you” to all the men and women who put their lives on the line to fight fires, save lives, homes and animals. And thank you to the families who must be in a constant state of worry during fire season.

With that said, today, I’m talking about heat stroke prevention. I’ve said it before, I know, but I truly believe prevention is the key to healthy and safe living.

But in order to prevent anything, we have to be aware. Aware of our body, gut and surroundings. When we get a symptom or a signal, we have to act swiftly.

With prevention in mind the following tips are brought to you by the CDC and the Mayo Clinic.

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Heatstroke requires emergency treatment. Untreated heatstroke can quickly damage your brain, heart, kidneys and muscles. The damage worsens the longer treatment is delayed, increasing your risk of serious complications or death.

Mayo Clinic

Protect Against Sunburn.

Sunburn affects your body’s ability to cool itself. So consider wearing a wide-brimmed hat, sunglasses a broad-spectrum sunscreen with an SPF of at least 15. Apply sunscreen generously, and reapply every two hours — or more often if you’re swimming or sweating.

Drink Fluids. 💦

Staying hydrated will help your body sweat and maintain a normal body temperature.

Take Extra Precautions With Certain Medications.

I didn’t know this but apparently there are medications that can affect your body’s ability to stay hydrated and dissipate heat. (Keep reading)

Medications that affect your body’s ability to stay hydrated and respond appropriately to heat include some used to treat high blood pressure and heart problems (beta blockers, diuretics), reduce allergy symptoms (antihistamines), calm you (tranquilizers), or reduce psychiatric symptoms such as delusions (antipsychotics). Additionally, some illegal drugs, such as cocaine and amphetamines, can increase your core temperature.

Mayo Clinic

Take it Easy During the Hottest Part of the Day.

If you can’t avoid strenuous activity in hot weather, drink fluids and rest frequently in a cool spot. Try to schedule exercise or physical labor for cooler parts of the day, such as early morning or evening.

Bonus Reminder.

Never leave anyone in a parked car. Please.

This is a common cause of heat-related deaths in children. When parked in the sun, the temperature in your car can rise 20 degrees F (more than 6.7 C) in 10 minutes.

It’s not safe to leave a person in a parked car in warm or hot weather, even if the windows are cracked or the car is in shade. When your car is parked, keep it locked to prevent a child from getting inside.

If you’d like to learn more about heat stroke prevention and causes please go to the Mayo Clinic or the CDC.