Thought For The Week, Aspire To Be YOU

Aspiring to be our genuine self is probably one of the hardest things to do.—April Maye

so many in social media are there with the intent to sell something even if it’s only an image. as such, they show you something they’re usually not—perfect, financially wealthy, humble, honest, the list goes on.

the desire to be seen, heard and valued amongst the masses leads to false representation, copycatting and plagiarism. the desperation on the Internet highway is REAL

i see so many women i once respected for their message or brand succumb to the pressure to be someone else. they hop from one bandwagon to the next. inappropriately use causes for selfish gain. steal someone’s idea, quote or tagline. some change the words of others to make them seem like their own, and some don’t even bother making changes. they just regurgitate it without shame or embarrassment for the whole world to see.

in doing so these women fail to show up for themselves.

i’ve had my experiences with this type. i’m always so disappointed and shocked by their lack of awareness. and, while i’ve never been tempted to steal from others, i have had the feeling that i am not good enough. especially since i started blogging. I’ve written about that HERE.

i’ve compared myself to more established bloggers. we’ve all wanted those followers at some time or another. we all want to succeed.

but the desperate need for recognition and “follows” leads people to make big business mistakes. mistake that will not only damage their reputation, but inhibit them from achieving the one thing they really want: success.

with that said, here’s this week’s quote and something to think about.

Created with Canva. Quote by The Lifestyle Brief ©️ 2020

My Menopause Aha! Moment

I was loading the dishwasher when I realized how bad I felt. I was sad. Sad like something bad happened. It reminded me of how I felt after the loss of my sister. It was in that moment I acknowledged the direct connection between my emotions and menopause.

Continue reading “My Menopause Aha! Moment”

Menopause Meltdown

Dear friends and menopause survivors, today I come to you in the midst of a menopause meltdown.

Menopause has been nothing but an uphill climb.

Two of the most challenging symptoms for me have been clumsiness, and memory failure.

As I write this I can’t find a credit card I had in my hand an hour ago.

I’ve turned the entire house upside down trying to find it. I’ve turned my purse and wallet inside out.

I’ve taken everything out of my freezer and refrigerator—-yes, I said the freezer and the refrigerator.

You’d be surprised how many things end up there these days.

Adding insult to injury is that I can’t even re-trace my steps because I don’t remember what I was doing when the card was in my hand.

I know I made tacos for lunch. I can only hope the card didn’t make it into the pan.

Maybe I got a phone call. Maybe I got a text message. Maybe I had to go to the bathroom. Maybe my brain just took a break at an inconvenient time.

But whatever the reason, I can’t find it. And all I feel is defeat, frustration and upset.

This happens a lot since menopause charged into my life like a bull in a china shop.

Some days I can’t remember where I parked my car. And I’m always on the hunt for something: my keys, my underwear or my glasses–usually on my face.

The glasses, that is. Not the underwear. If those end up on my head then menopause has completely taken over.

A good day for me is when I leave the house with two matching shoes on and my lipstick on my face where it’s supposed to be.

Most women in menopause tend to be aggressive towards their husbands during this time. Some don’t even like them anymore.

(We’ll talk more about menopause divorce in another article).

Thankfully, I don’t feel that way about my husband.

But…I am re-thinking my strategy on that because when I’m in the menopause tunnel (that’s what I call it), I don’t have the patience for a 110 questions on why I thought spaghetti seemed like a good idea for dinner.

Also, I don’t have the patience for any tone I don’t recognize or a certain kind of teasing, both of which my husband did wrong at Costco over the weekend.

I truly thought I was going to end up on the news for giving him a menopause smackdown.

Thankfully, all ended well.

I still can’t find my credit card and while I can laugh a little now that I’ve written this, I’m still so bummed, because I have a purse in my shopping cart that I really need to purchase today.

Okay that’s a wrap for now. If you’re still here thank you for listening to me.

If you’re a menopause survivor I’d really love to hear from you.

What are your symptoms? How are you coping? How has menopause impacted you on an emotional level?

Speak your #menopausetruth here!

Menopause Minute: Nutrition, Supplements & Herbs

#MenopauseMinute | No. 8 | Story from drweil.com

In last weeks Menopause Minute Registered Dietitian, Halle Saperstein, reminded me/us that what you eat in menopause, can make a big difference in how you experience symptoms.

“When estrogen levels begin falling, we have to be more mindful of what we eat and how much we eat. We also have to make sure we’re getting a wide variety of nutrients to protect our bones and vital organs” — Saperstein

Because I think food and health go hand-in-hand I’m delving deeper into the food/body connection during menopause.

In the process I found some suggestions from Dr. Andrew Weil.

Soy foods. The isoflavones in soy foods help balance hormone levels and have some estrogenic activity. There is ongoing research about the safety and efficacy of isolated soy isoflavone supplements. While the initial results look promising, we currently recommend using natural soy foods rather than supplements. Choose from tofu, soy milk, roasted soy nuts or tempeh.

Flaxseed. Substances called lignins in flaxseed are important modulators of hormone metabolism. Grind flaxseed daily in a coffee grinder at home and use 1 to 2 tablespoons a day. (Definitely doing this one ASAP)

Dong quai. Dong quai (Angelica sinensis) is known both in China and the West for its ability to support and maintain the natural balance of female hormones. It does not have estrogenic activity. This is one of the herbs for menopause that should not be taken if a woman is experiencing heavy bleeding.

Black cohosh (Cumicifuga racemosa). One of the best-studied traditional herbs for menopause, black cohosh is used to help alleviate some symptoms of menopause, and is considered an effective hot flash remedy. Black cohosh seems to work by supporting and maintaining hormonal levels, which may lessen the severity of hot flashes. Many women report that the herb works well but it isn’t effective for everyone. While any therapy that influences hormonal actions should be a concern, black cohosh does not appear to have estrogenic activity and thus may be safe for women with a personal or family history of breast cancer.

Vitamin E. A daily dose of 400 IUs of natural vitamin E (as mixed tocopherols and tocotrienols) can help alleviate symptoms of hot flashes in some menopausal women.

B vitamins. This group of water-soluble vitamins may help women deal with the stress of menopausal symptoms.

Read more of Dr. Weil’s tips and advice HERE.

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